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NASA's REEL Science

    Communication Contest


About the Contest

NASA Earth Science missions are kicking off a new video contest engaging high school age students to produce a video communicating NASA Earth Science to younger students. Students are consuming over 10 hours of media a day and video is increasingly important to communicate and inform about science. NASA is looking for talented High School students to create videos that engage students in Earth Science.

Winners will have their videos posted on NASA's website. They will also get the opportunity to be a NASA Producer working with NASA scientists and communication experts in July 2014 to produce an Earth Science feature video.

Who can enter?

The contest is open to residents of the United States ages 13 to 18 on or before March 31, 2014. Submissions can be by individuals or teams.

What is the subject of the video?

Produce a two-minute video for a middle school audience that communicates one of the following science concepts:

  1. How Ice Impacts Climate and Climate Impacts Ice
  2. Forest Fire Effects on Air Quality
  3. Water of the Water Planet

How do I submit?

  1. Create a video explaining one of the science topics. Be sure to use NASA components including audio clips, animations, visualizations, or satellite images.
  2. Upload your video to YouTube and tag with "NASAREELscience2014" by 11:59pm EST on March 31, 2014.
  3. Within 72 hours you will receive a comment on your video that your video has been submitted.
  4. Finalists will be required to send their video file to NASA along with a supplied contest Submission Release Form by 11:59pm EST on April 30, 2014.
  5. Winners will be announced April 30, 2014 on our website.

When is the deadline?

Videos must be uploaded and tagged with "NASAREELscience2014" on YouTube by 11:59pm EST March 31, 2014.

How will the videos be judged?

NASA producers, communications experts, and scientists will be judging the videos for science accuracy, creativity, use of NASA data, and video quality. Videos that are inaudible, blurry, or contain resources (other than NASA imagery) that are not original will be immediately disqualified. (See contest guidelines for more details.)

How will finalists be notified?

Finalists will receive a comment on their YouTube video. Check YouTube after March 31st to see if you have been selected. Finalists will have 15 days to submit their video file and waiver via email to NASA. Videos with waivers not received by 11:59pm EST April 15th will be disqualified.

What are the prizes?

Winning videos will announced on April 30, 2014 and posted on the NASA website. Winners will get the opportunity to work remotely with NASA producers and communications experts on a current NASA Earth Science Story in July 2014. Participation will include access to NASA personnel through webinars and online communication tools (e.g., Skype). Final produced stories will be posted on a NASA website and have the chance of being highlighted on www.nasa.gov. See contest guidelines for required release forms.

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Video Contest Topics

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How Ice Impacts Climate and Climate Impacts Ice

Produce a two-minute video explaining how ice impacts climate and climate impacts ice. Elaborate on how satellite observations from NASA's ICE-Sat 2 are helping scientists study the relationship between ice and climate.

Include enough science background to set up your story. Enhance your video with your own resources such as audio, stop-motion animation, puppet-shows, analogies, etc. Keep in mind your audience. Videos should be fun, informative, but still convey scientifically accurate information. Be sure to include some NASA satellite images and/or visualizations.

Resources
Consult the following resources to learn about the topic and collect assets (visualizations, audio, and images) to supplement your video.
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Forest Fire Effects on Air Quality

Produce a two-minute video explaining how forest fires affect air quality. Elaborate on how satellite observations from NASA's MODIS and MOPITT onboard the Terra satellite are helping scientists study the impact of forest fires on air quality.

Include enough science background to set up your story. Enhance your video with your own resources such as audio, stop-motion animation, puppet-shows, analogies, etc. Keep in mind your audience. Videos should be fun, informative, but still convey scientifically accurate information. Be sure to include some NASA satellite images and/or visualizations.

Resources
Consult the following resources to learn about the topic and collect assets (visualizations, audio, and images) to supplement your video.
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Water of the Water Planet

Produce a two-minute video explaining any aspect of water in the Earth system. This could be water in the oceans, water on the land, or water in the atmosphere; it could be about glaciers, hurricanes, floods, or numerous other possibilities; and it could focus on one phase of water (liquid, solid, or gaseous) or how the phases are tied together in the water cycle. Include details about something that is being learned about water through the space-based observations made by NASA's Aqua spacecraft, which was named for all the information it is providing about water in the Earth system.

Include enough science background to set up your story. Enhance your video with your own resources such as audio, stop-motion animation, puppet-shows, analogies, etc. Keep in mind that the main audience should be middle school students. Videos should be fun, informative, but still convey scientifically accurate information. Be sure to include some NASA satellite images and/or visualizations.

Resources
The following resources are available for you to use to learn about the topic and to collect visualizations, audio, and/or images to incorporate in your video if you want.

Videos Aqua video podcast series Videos and animations from the NASA Goddard Scientific Visualization Studio

Additional visualizations also available from the NASA Goddard Scientific Visualization Studio and from the Earth Observatory

Technical information
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Contest Guidelines

Video Requirements

Submissions must not exceed 2 minutes. They must not contain offensive or inappropriate language or subject matter. Videos must be appropriate for a middle school audience.

Videos must be original work (excluding NASA generated material)

Submissions, including video, audio, text, illustrations, animations, and any ancillary material made by the student(s) must be original work and must not be copied from another work, photograph, illustration, published website, or made by another author. This includes, but is not limited to, Facebook, Flicker or any other social media websites where photos have been posted and shared. Material including video, animation, audio, and ancillary material created by and published on a NASA website are encouraged to be included in submissions.

Required forms

Finalists will be notified by March 31, 2014 via a comment on their YouTube video tagged with "NASAREELscience2014". All finalists will be required to complete the Submission Release Form and send to NASA with their video file by April 15, 2014. Videos with waivers not received by 11:59pm EST April 15th will be disqualified.

All winners are required to submit a Personal Release Form before their winning video can be posted on the NASA website.

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